Youth In The News: Lobbyists For The Millennials? Check!

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The past week was packed with amazing youth-related news, and we present to you our pick of the most important and most inspiring stories. The topic for this week is the future.

Lobbyists for the Millennials? Check!

When it comes to Millennials there is one thing we, as a generation have in common, and that is: we are loud. Our needs, views, wishes, and plans are widely known. We are outspoken, we are the focus of attention, we are in the media. However in the Land of the brave and home of the free an association has been created to ensure that Millennials are represented in the political life of the US as well. The Association of Young Americans (aka AYA) was founded in March this year and their slogan is: „ Everyone else has lobbyists. Now you do too . . . at least according to AYA founder Ben Brown, a 27-year-old New-Yorker whose initiative has brought in several hundred supporters in a short period of time. The overall plan is to create a group, hire people, and go after Congress after the Presidential elections this November. The membership fee is $20, and it includes multiple benefits so far. Considering the fact that this initiative is only a couple of months old we expect it to blossom and spread worldwide ASAP. The membership benefits will be 100% Millennial-oriented – meeting our needs and providing discounts for foods, fashion, travel destinations, and other Millennial favorites. So if this sounds appealing make sure to Google them and join an initiative that is expected to have multiple millions of members in the near future.

Originally published at Good.is.

#LaBoracay #NesteaLoveTheBeach #SaveSexy

Celebrating Labor Day may sound like something from the old-days, something for the older generation, but Millennials are not willing to give this holiday up. Millennials just do it their way, I mean our way. In the Philippines, Labor Day is traditionally celebrated by young people on Boracay Island, and it’s a true Millennials-style celebration. As you all can see by the title of this news summary –social media is a big part of the celebration. Besides the social media segment, this Millennials party is focused on volunteering for eco-friendly actions, freebies, and a whole bunch of beach and jungle parties. The celebration is also used to promote the #SaveSexy campaign to raise awareness of HIV. Volleyball was a huge part of this event also, but as it is a youth-organized celebration – let’s be real: parties were the most important item on the agenda. And so each year #LaBoracay will be hosting this unique festivity to celebrate Labor Day, Millenial-style. One can only congratulate them and urge others to visit the Philippines next year and join the party.

Originally published at LifeStyle.Inquirer.net.

Early retirement? Why not?

We are back to surveys on Millennials, and this time it’s all about hopes and dreams. In some of our previous posts we have discussed the issue of retirement for the Millennials as most countries are increasing the age limit and most experts believe that not a lot of our generation will live long enough to retire. However, Millennials are not willing to spend their entire lives working 9 to 5. In a recent study conducted by bank ING DIRECT, 33 per cent of youth plan to retire before the age of 40. Now to some this may sound ridiculous and unrealistic, but these Millennials have a plan. To work extra hours now, to invest in small businesses, to launch start-ups and to enjoy the incomes these activities generate by the time they turn 35 or 40 years old; this may sound like a dream, but many young people are living it as we speak. The basic dream Millennials have is to spend their late 30s and 40s traveling around the world, and they are willing to invest their time now to be able to live their dream 10 years from now.

Originally published at HuffingtonPost.com.au.

Teen Health Fest held in Nelson

One can say that one part of being a teenager is being curious and embarrassed when it comes to your body. Health issues among teens, providing non-formal education and opening their views were the main goals of the Teen Health Fest, which was held last month in Nelson, New Zealand. The Festival is part of National Youth Week, and it included visits to nine schools in the region. The main goal was to encourage teens to feel comfortable and confident about asking for medical help when needed. The Teen Health Fest included activities like yoga and mindfulness workshops, but also the students could book an appointment with a nurse or a doctor, free of charge. Among the biggest hits of this year’s festival were the drunk goggles – used to simulate drunk-like views so that the students could see what it means to drink and drive. Other activities included lectures and workshops about the effects of alcohol and drugs on the human body.

Originally published at Stuff.co.nz.

ONE – Youth on a deadline

We have all been there – facing a deadline to complete an assignment. This story, however, has a twist. The deadline is the year 2030 and the assignment is: the end of extreme poverty and preventable diseases. Now when I put it this way it sounds like a science-fiction scenario. When I tell you that the goal was set by Nelson Mandela for the Youth Ambassadors the story begins to make sense. The Youth Ambassadors spoke about this plan during the unique ONE summit, which was held in Paris from 21st of May to June 2nd. This precedent-setting youth summit gathered together 250 Youth Ambassadors representing more than 50 nationalities from around the world with the same goal – to figure out how to urge the world’s leaders to unite and fight for the common goal of ending extreme poverty. As the Millennials are the Youth Ambassadors – the date and the place of the summit was not a random pick – the event was held during the OECD Forum attended by representatives of more than 40 of the richest countries in the world. The ONE summit included a campaign, several discussions, and a giant stunt on the streets of Paris. The Youth Ambassadors also met with highly-influential leaders and representatives.

Originally published at Euractiv.com.

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