The Future of the Real World Web

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In just over five years, there will be over 30 billion devices connected to the web. The majority of these devices won’t be a smartphone, tablet or computer. As everything from home appliances to entire city systems begin to come online, we are moving into the era of the Real World Web.

Community Net

We are moving towards a future of increased connectivity. New software platforms and tools are connecting people in whole new ways. We are building a new sense of community on the web. From sensors to wearable devices, the internet of the future will allow us to access data and create custom experiences that can be shared in ways that have never been done before.

Shared Awareness – Wearable devices which monitor, capture and broadcast important information at key moments.

Design Studio, Lunar Agency, has created a wearable device which gives users a “butterfly feeling” when someone nearby has shared interests. The device, designed to look like jewelry, taps into your social network, gathers information and figures out who you might like. It then uses this information to send you an alert when that person is in the area around you, subtly prompting you to “break the ice”.

Programmable Lifestyle – An emerging marketplace of simple programming interfaces which enable people to better connect with their devices and the wider community. 

The Ninja Sphere is a household device that gives users complete control over every object in their home. Using built-in wifi and bluetooth, the gadget can keep track of anything in the house, including the cat. The device is not pre-programmed with any specific functions, instead it allows the user to create interesting ways to program it as they see fit.

Open Source Access – Challenging the notion of ownership and privacy online, by building an open framework to link different connected devices.

Dweet.io is a software platform which allows any product, device, machine, or ‘thing’ connected to the Internet to easily publish its own data socially. Users can insert a bit of code onto a device, and push the data across various social media platforms.

Empathy Tech

A new breed of social and attentive devices are being integrated into daily life which are capable of understanding a wider range of human needs and behaviors. They are able to provide relevant assistance and support at key moments, opening up the possibility of more intimate relationships with the objects in our lives.

Behavioral Nudge – Connected objects that are capable of monitoring daily routines to understand patterns in behavior.

Design student Lucas Neumann has developed a new desktop device called Bossy to help entrepreneurs and self-employees manage their time and be more productive. The device uses gamification to keep workers engaged and free from distractions.The device is sensitive to the bodily and emotional needs of its owner and also suggests when they should take a break.


Emotional Response
– Sensors and image recognition capabilities are being paired with sophisticated algorithms to bring a deeper understanding of human emotions.

EmoSPARK is an “artificial intelligence console” that uses face-tracking and language analysis to assess user emotions and deliver relevant content suited to the situation.

Contextual Experience – Sensors which leverage real-time user data to deliver relevant information to mobile devices.

MindMeld is a new app for iOS, which predicts and provides information related to the context of a conversation. If you are planning a trip, it will find a map of the city or if you are eating out, it will recommend local restaurants.

Adaptive Machines – Connected objects and devices that evolve from reactive to adaptive.

The in-car app Smartcar for Tesla helps drivers reduce their electricity bill by optimizing energy use while driving. It also helps them avoid peak hour rates when recharging. The learning system adapts to the driver’s behaviors for a more personalized driving experience, such as knowing when to heat up the car on a cold morning before a commute.

 

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