The American University of Afghanistan Could Be Closed in 2020

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In this week’s news, we speak about possible closure of the American University of Afghanistan, Rwanda’s plan to scrap poverty criterion for student loans and decline in interest of students for Saturday jobs.

A view of central Kabul, Afghanistan

Possible closure of the American University of Afghanistan

CNN reports that the American University of Afghanistan could be closed in 2020. This decision could be made in the case institution’s stream of funding gets cut. The university has been opened in 2006 and since then it offered an important opportunity for both men and women. So far, it was mostly funded by the US Agency for International Development, but the agency could provide an assurance that it will continue funding the university. The current funding could last until May. David Sedney, the university’s president, said: “It is really important that we address what could be the worst-case scenario.”

Rwanda scraps poverty criterion for student loans

University World News reports that Rwanda’s plan to scrap poverty as the criteria for student loans has been welcomed by the public. The system, previously known as “Ubudehe”, has been removed and the government decided to stop looking into family assets as the criterion for student loans. Throughout the years, inadequate family funds were as equally important as sound academic record. Prime Minister Dr Edouard Ngirente said: “I can assure you that Ubudehe will not be one of the conditions we will be basing [the decision] on to award any student scholarship. It will purely be based on the student’s knowledge and marks.”

Students’ interest in Saturday jobs significantly smaller

Independent reports that the number of students interested in “earning while learning” almost declined by 50 percent. Many youngsters decide to focus on their studies and avoid doing Saturday jobs. Less teenagers now work as shelf stackers, packers, retail cashiers, bottlers and postal workers. Laura Gardiner, research director at the Resolution Foundation, said: “The rising number of people who have never had a paid job has been driven by the death of the teenage Saturday job and a wider turn away from earning while learning.”

Photo: Shutterstock

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