Post Malone’s Twelve Carat Toothache New Album Review

The hit-maker Post Malone returns with another album after a three-year break.

Austin Richard Post, known as Post Malone, is back with his fourth album titled Twelve Carat Toothache. He worked on this album for almost two years prior to its release date on June 3. When listening to it it’s clear that the pandemic and the lockdown phases that everyone went through have strongly affected this album. With 14 tracks and a runtime of 44 minutes, has Post Malone come up with yet another album full of hits? 

 

Tracklist Review

The songs from Twelve Carat Toothache feel more personal than ever before for Post Malone. He’s reflecting on fame, where he stands now within the music industry, and ultimately, how he feels like everyone just needs some banger songs to get out of the quarantine mindset. Although this is Malone’s shortest album so far, it still includes some of his best and most introspective songs. 

From the first track Reputation, Post Malone sets the tone for the album. It’s a somewhat slow song with vulnerable lyrics. The effects and price of fame and his relationships are sung about here. Immediately thereafter though, Post Malone collaborates with Roddy Ricch and they both deliver bars that make for a very entertaining summer hit. 

Perhaps no song on the album is as catchy as Wrapped Around Your Finger. With an incredible and fun chorus, Malone delivers yet another vibey track. Doja Cat appears on the fifth track I Like You (A Happier Song) which as you can tell from the title is going to be a little bit of a faster pace. On the contrary, the next song is titled I Cannot Be (A Sadder Song). Post Malone has mastered the use of autotune and the making of songs that you will not be able to stop humming no matter where you are. 

The second half of the album is quite another vibe. The indie band Fleet Foxes makes an appearance as well on the eighth track Love/Hate Letter to Alcohol. The Kid LAROI is featured on Wasting Angeles. Alongside the usual bragging and hype lyrics, Post Malone really does try to reflect on his life before and after fame. On the second-to-last track One Right Now Post Malone is joined by The Weeknd for a hit that may have flown a little under the radar since it came out. It’s a good song and both singers do a great job performing it. 

Critical and Commercial Reception 

Twelve Carat Toothache has mostly positive reviews although there have been quite some mixed opinions on this album. Some have called it the best album of Post Malone’s career so far while others have complained about unsatisfying results. 

One thing is for certain — through each track Post Malone seems to have at the very least tried to fulfill a specific goal. Now whether he hits or misses on his intentions that’s up to the listener to decide. However, it can’t be said that he didn’t put some thought behind every track. His demeanor has not shifted much based on the lyrical value he has to offer, however, and especially if you’re already a Post Malone fan, you will enjoy this album to no end. 

The guest artists on the album do a good job of supporting Post Malone but in the end, everything depends on his delivery and despite all the mixed reviews, he does deliver a good album here. There are so many potential hits and definitely something for everyone. Be prepared because you’ll for sure be hearing these songs everywhere this summer. 

 

Photo: Ben Houdijk/Shutterstock

 


You might also like:

Kendrick Lamar’s Mr. Morale & the Big Steppers Album Review


 

Support us!

All your donations will be used to pay the magazine’s journalists and to support the ongoing costs of maintaining the site.

 

paypal smart payment button for simple membership

Share this post

Interested in co-operating with us?

We are open to co-operation from writers and businesses alike. You can reach us on our email at cooperations@youth-time.eu/magazine@youth-time.eu and we will get back to you as quick as we can.

Where to next?

Are Cinemas Dying?

That the pandemic has dealt a major blow to movie theatres is clear, but just how bad is the damage done?