North Korean Universities Open New Majors Focusing on Technology

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In this week’s news we speak about the merger of two Taiwanese universities after 20 years of negotiations, Huawei’s plan to invest $300 million in universities and North Korea’s new university majors.

Pyongyang, North Korea - Students learning in a computer study room

Merger of Taiwanese universities after 20 years of negotiations

Taiwan News reports that after two decades of negotiation, National Yang-Ming University (NYMU) and Chiao Tung University (NCTU) have  scheduled to hold a council meeting simultaneously on September 18 to decide whether to merge together as National Yang-Ming and Chiao Tung University (YMCT). Once all the procedures are carried out YMCT will then comprise 19 colleges, six research centers and one teaching hospital across nine campuses along with roughly 18,000 students and 1,200 professors. Once the two universities merge, the enrolled students will receive their graduation certificate from YMCT regardless of which university they originally enrolled in.

Huawei plans to spend $300 million on universities

Reuters reports that a senior company executive said on Tuesday that Huawei plans to spend more than $300 million a year in research funding for universities. Huawei has been fighting a trade ban from Washington that has hurt its business since May. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Britain’s Oxford University cut ties with the company. William Xu, president of the telecommunications equipment maker’s institute of strategic research, said it was only a few institutions which had suspended their ties with the firm and that Huawei would allocate funding to institutions where the company was still welcomed and that the stated amount is only going to increase, not decrease from now on.

North Korean universities open new majors

Yonhap News Agency reports that 37 North Korean universities established 85 new majors focusing on science and technology this year, including those in the fields of medical equipment, information security, nano-material engineering and robot engineering. The article also states that 11 new high schools specialized in information technology will be open in each province, as well as one middle school in every city which will focus on technology education. North Korea has been stressing the importance of improving its science and technology levels, revising its constitution in April to state that “science and technology power is the nation’s most important strategic resource.”

Photo: Shutterstock

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