Iceland has most women students in Europe

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We’ve highlighted below some of the most recent developments and occurrences in youth-related news and events. In this week’s news roundup we speak about Australian elite universities that urge government to financially support students, university libraries in Ireland that extended their working hours to cope with increasing demand and Iceland that has most women students in Europe.

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Australian elite universities urge government to support students

Elite universities are pressuring government to increase their support for students coming from low socioeconomic backgrounds, reports The Sydney Morning Herald. The Group of Eight, which is the body that represents Australian elite research universities (e.g. the University of Sydney and the University of Melbourne) asked government to raise student welfare payments by at least $75 a week. Vicki Thomson, who is the Group of Eight chief executive said: “The level of support for those students who are most in need of it, is in dire need of an increase.”

University libraries in Ireland extend working hours to cope with demand

Irish universities are extending their library closing times in order to cope with demand for late-night study, reports Irish Times. The Royal College of Surgeons Ireland library was closing its doors at 1am last March, while UCC’s library was staying open until 1.30am. Other libraries, such as those at the University of Limerick and the UCD are regularly staying open until midnight. Barry Murphy, president of UCD students’ union said: “You have students stressing about only getting 2:1s. instead of 1:1s; there’s peer pressure when they see others doing well; there are parental expectations; and there’s self-imposed pressure, too.”

Iceland has most women students in Europe

At 64 percent, Iceland is the country with the largest number of women students in Europe, reports Inside Higher Education. The campus gender imbalance at the University of Reykjavik has reached an extreme extent. Every male student has on average two female course mates and the ratio at the master’s level is closer to one to three. Jón Atli Benediktsson, the university’s president and rector said: “We are seeing this concern in many countries.” According to the EU statistics, women make up 54 percent of students.

Photo: Shutterstock

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