”Gentleman’s Agreement” And ”Mankind” Banned In Favour Of Gender-neutral Terms

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We’ve highlighted below some of the most recent developments and occurrences in youth-related news and events.

Travel ban denounced by universities in Europe and the USA

The travel ban that was issued on the 6th of March by President Donald Trump has been denounced by universities in both Europe and the USA. The Association of American Universities (AAU), which represents 62 institutions, has declared that the ban is a threat to ”America’s global leadership in higher education.” The Association of International Educators (NAFSA) has stated that the ban undermines the nation’s ”long-held values.” One of the countries that is affected by the ban is Iran. There are around 12.000 students from Iran studying abroad, and the decision has seriously damaged America’s reputation in the higher education sector. The European University Association (EUA) has stated that it is ”deeply concerned” with an ideology that prevents the ”free flow of people and ideas.”

Phrases such as ”gentleman’s agreement” and ”mankind” banned in favour of gender-neutral terms

Phrases such as “gentleman’s agreement” and “right-hand man” have been banned at a UK university in favor of gender neutral pronouns. The decision has caused controversy, and Cardiff Metropolitan University has been accused of censoring free speech. Many people from academic circles believe that the ban was unnecessary.

Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Guide to Inclusive Language:

Term – Suggested alternatives

“Best man for the job” – Best person for the job

“Businessman/woman” – Businessperson, manager, executive

“Chairman/woman” – Chair, chairperson, convenor, head

“Charwoman, cleaning lady” – Cleaner

“Craftsman/woman” – Craftsperson, craft worker

“Delivery man” – Delivery clerk, courier

“Dear Sirs” – Dear Sir/Madam (or Madam/Sir)

“Fireman” – Fire-fighter

“Forefathers” – Ancestors, forebears

“Foreman/woman” – Supervisor, head juror

“Gentleman’s agreement” – Unwritten agreement, agreement based on trust

“Girls” (for adults) – Women

“Headmaster/mistress” – Head teacher

“Housewife” – Shopper, consumer, homemaker (depends on context)

“Layman” – Lay person

“Man” or “mankind” – Humanity, humankind, human race, people

“Man” (verb) e.g. man the desk – Operate, staff, work at

“Man in the street”, “common man” – Average/ordinary/typical citizen/person – but is there such a person?

“Man-hour” – Work-hour, labour time

“Man-made” – Artificial, manufactured, synthetic

“Manpower” – Human resources, labour force, staff, personnel, workers, workforce

“Miss/Mrs” – Ms. unless a specific preference has been stated – though it is common not to use titles at all these days

“Policeman/woman” – Police Officer

“Right-hand man” – Chief assistant

“Salesman/girl/woman” – Sales assistant/agent/clerk/representative/staff/worker

“Spokesman/woman” – Spokesperson, representative

“Sportsmanship” – Fairness, good humour, sense of fair play

“Steward/ess” – Airline staff, flight attendant, cabin crew

“Tax man” – Tax officer/inspector

“Waitress” – Waiter, server

“Woman doctor” (or feminine forms of nouns e.g. actress, poetess) – Doctor (actor, poet etc.)

“Working man”, “working mother/wife” – Wage-earner/taxpayer/worker

“Workman” – Worker/operative/trades person

“Workmanlike” – Efficient/proficient/skilful/thorough

Places for disadvantaged students offered to private school graduates

The Scholars’ scheme is a pilot programme that allows twenty schools in Bristol to nominate five students each, based on their potential rather than academic results. In this way pupils from poorer backgrounds have an opportunity to apply to a top-ranking university with lower grades than the stated requirement. The University of Bristol was criticized after it was discovered that a scheme that was created specifically for students from disadvantaged backgrounds has been awarded to graduates of private schools. Many students stated that it makes no sense to include students who were sufficiently privileged to have a private education.

Photo: Shutterstock

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