Finnish Vocational Universities Launch a New Joint Entrance Exam

57

In this week’s news we speak about the end of inspection of Iranian universities by the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI), potential partnership between Peking and Cambridge universities and a new joint entrance exam for Finland’s vocational universities.

Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) ends inspection of Iranian universities

FarsNews Agency reports that the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran’s (AEOI) spokesperson stated that it will no longer inspect Iranian universities that conduct research on nuclear-related materials. Behrouz Kamalvandi also added: “We have been trying to end all Agency inspections of universities (and now this has happened) and therefore, there is no more problem with regard to the inspection of universities.” After the 2015 nuclear deal between the world powers and Iran, the Agency was established in order to take care of the inspection for the United Nations.  This move angered Iranian students, who protested on several occasions due to uncalled inspections of universities and research centers by the IAEA.

Peking University and Cambridge University discuss partnership

South China Morning Post reports that Peking University and Cambridge University are discussing potential partnership. Universities that are traditionally placed high in the Times Higher Education World University Ranking are talking about setting up this partnership in Shenzhen, within Qianhai special economic zone. Mark Welland, deputy vice chancellor of Cambridge, said: “The idea will be initially to build upon a planned collaboration between the business school in Shenzhen for PKU and the Cambridge Judge Business School and then to see those developed into other areas beyond business.”

New joint entrance exam in Finland

YLE reports that Finnish vocational universities have decided to launch a new joint entrance exam. Starting from this autumn, all universities of applied sciences will be having the same digital entrance exam for their students.  The goal of the exam is to assess student’s communication, language and general logic skills. Marko Borodavkin, who is the program’s project manager, said: “This is one of the most noteworthy student selection reforms in the history of Finnish polytechnics. It is a very large change, involving the entire sector.” This change is part of the larger reforms aimed at transformation of student selection practices in the country.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...