Bookmark This: Exotic Coffee Drinks You Can Make at Home

300

There is something about a little coffee drink on a winter afternoon or  evening meeting with a friends that just always works. We have collected some of the best recipes of  coffee drinks from all over the World that you can make at home. Enjoy.

Vietnamese Egg Coffee – Ca Phe Trung 
See picture above

In Vietnam coffee is almost like dessert, often drunk after lunch. Two table spoons of sweetened condensed milk are whisked in a bowl and a tablespoon of coffee is then added and also whisked. After that the leftover brewed coffee is poured into a cup or glass and the egg mixture is added on top.

  • one egg
  • three teaspoons of Vietnamese coffee powder (try looking for it at SAPA)
  • two teaspoons of sweetened condensed milk
  • water

Brew a small cup of coffee. Separate the egg yolk and throw away the whites. Whisk the egg and milk in a bowl until it is fluffy – then add a tablespoon of brewed coffee and whisk. Then pour the coffee into a cup and add the egg mixture on top.

Moroccan Peppercorn Coffee

Black peppercorn is an essential part of coffee for Moroccans. Along with spicy coffee, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom pods, cloves, nutmeg and other spices are also used in Morocco to spice up a cup of coffee.

  • ¼ of a teaspoon of freshly ground cinnamon
  • ¼ of a teaspoon of freshly ground black peppercorns
  • ¼ of a teaspoon of freshly ground ginger
  • ¼ of a teaspoon of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/8 of a teaspoon of freshly ground green cardamom seeds
  • 1/8 of teaspoon of freshly ground clove
  • 1 cup of freshly roasted coffee beans
  • 4 cups of water
  • milk and sugar optional

Combine spices with coffee beans and grind finely then boil water. Pour coffee mixture into a paper-lined brewing cup and add water until the coffee “blooms”.

Hong Kong Yuan Yang – Coffee/tea

Three parts coffee and seven parts milk tea – this drink can be served either hot or cold. This drink is very popular in Hong Kong but people also drink it in Ethiopia, known as a ‘spreeze’.

  • 3 cups of water
  • ¼ cup of black tea leaves or six tea bad
  • 1 can of evaporated milk or sweetened condensed milk
  • sugar
  • 3 cups of strong coffee

Boil water and add tea, simmer for three minutes. Stir in the milk and simmer for three more minutes. Stir in the coffee and sugar, then strain. Serve hot or chilled over ice.

Ethiopian Buna

Ethiopia, the birthplace of coffee, has a special coffee ceremony that is a vital part of their life both socially and culturally. In the countryside coffee is taken with salt and eaten with snacks including popcorn. Milk isn’t added and it is common to drink coffee in the morning, after lunch and for dinner.

  • 2/3 cup of green beans
  • coffee grinder
  • a coffee pot
  • coffee roasting pan/skillet

The beans are roasted, and then ground and boiling water is added. Then salt is added based on taste and salty snacks are eaten alongside it.

Sour Brazilian Coffee

In Sao Paulo and Italy you can get espresso with lime! Either the peel or the juice is used to cool down coffee and can be used to remedy a migraine. As a bonus it makes a badly roasted coffee sweeter.

  • ground coffee beans
  • lime
  • water

Normally made coffee with added lime peel or juice based on preference. It can also be served cold.

 

Swedish Coffee with Butter

Swedish coffee breaks are known as “fikas” that traditionally happen at least once a day combined with sweet dessert. The older generation often adds 1/5th of a stick of butter to a large cup of coffee.

  • ground coffee beans
  • water
  • 1/5th of a stick of butter

Again, normal coffee with bitter added based on preference.

 

Indonesian Kopi Joss

Some people can’t handle coffee’s acidity. The cure is charcoal. In Yogyakarta a hot piece of charcoal neutralizes the acidity is known as Kopi Joss and makes it easier for a stomach to process it.

  • ground coffee beans
  • water
  • sugar
  • piece of coal

Again this is just a normally brewed coffee with a burning piece of coal added at the end.

Indonesian Avocado Coffee

Es Alpukat Kopi is what is known as avocado coffee! The ingredients for a typical serving of coffee are half an avocado, half a cup of condensed milk, two teaspoons of vanilla and one third of a cup of espresso – serves on two cups of ice cubes. It is drunk as a healthy early morning starter and sometimes used as an appetizer.

  • ½ of a ripe large avocado
  • 1/3 cup of espresso or one cup of strong brewed coffee – cooled
  • ½ cup of sweetened condensed milk (not evaporated)
  • 2 cups of ice cubes
  • 2 teaspoons of vanila

Avocado flesh must first be scooped into a blender and the rest of the ingredients must be pureed for one minute until completely smooth.

Saudi Arabian Kahwa

In Saudi Arabia, cardamom is an ingredient used in coffee that is served with dates that are sweet and dried. The Bedouin tradition has the youngest person pour coffee for his elders.

  • 1 tablespoon of preferably Arabic coffee
  • 2 roughly ground tablespoons of cardamoms
  • 2 cups of water
  • ¼ teaspoons of saffron are optional

Warm the coffee on a low heat – add water and bring to boil. Remove from heat and filter once the coffee is settled. Then add cardamom and saffron and bring to boil once again. Simmer for 20 minutes before drinking.

Mexican Café de Olla

A change from all the bitter and/or salty coffees, Mexicans add molasses and cinnamon to their coffee. The beans should not be fully ground, and brown sugar is an essential touch.

  • 2/3 cup of dark roasted coffee ground
  • 1 quart of water
  • 1 stick of cinnamon
  • 1 piece of orange peel (3 inches)
  • 1 cup of packed dark brown sugar

Put coffee grounds, water, sugar, cinnamon and orange peel on a saucepan – over medium heat. Stir while bringing to boil and dissolve the sugar. Take it off the heat and let it steep while covered for 5 minutes. Finally strain and serve.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...