An Underdog in Wine Production— Australia

When traveling to Australia in search of amazing landscapes, you'd be surprised by the amount of wine production and vineyards along the coast. Let's take a deep-dive into Aussie wine.

Wine production in Australia is the sixth largest in the world for wine making and the fourth largest exporter internationally.

As early as the mid 19th century, immigrants from Italy, Switzerland, and Germany established family owned wineries in the country. These vineyards were mainly in the Barossa, and Clare valleys as they were suitable for growing European variety grapes.

Today, in addition to Barossa and Clare Valleys—there are several regions in the vast outback that produce some of the most excellent wines.

 

Barossa Valley

Being among the oldest wine regions, Barossa Valley has in particular made a name for itself for Shiraz, Riesling, Cabernet Sauvignon and several fortified wines. Fortified wines are distilled and each winemaker has its own methods. These are usually Sherry, Madeira, Marsala, Vermouth, Sherry Brandies which are usually sweeter than Cognac and Port wine. 

Even though the origins of port wine are in Portugal, it is now produced in several parts of the world.

There’s much to do when you are in Barossa Valley. Once you’ve enjoyed wine tasting and buying you can head for the Kapunda Mine Trail, visit Tanunda where most of the inhabitants are descendants of Germans, drive through the Barossa Heritage trail or go on a heritage walk in Angaston. 

The conservation parks in the valley are popular with hikers. The valley is also famous for artisanal foods prepared from farm fresh produce and dairy goods.

Clare Valley 

Most wine lovers head to Australia for the Clare Valley with the first stop being Adelaide and then Barossa following. Adelaide is well known as the cosmopolitan coastal capital in Southern Australia. It has famous museums with extensive collections of indigenious art and natural history. The city is also well known for the annual festival of arts and films. 

Clare Valley is widely renowned for its Riesling wines.

Most people who travel to Clare Valley for tasting and buying do not want to miss the local food. We recommend going on a drive to explore the mining township of Burra and the heritage tour they have in the same area.

 

Mornington Peninsula 

Located just over 70 kilometers from Melbourne is the Mornington Peninsula, famous for some of the best Shiraz and Pinot Noir. While you’re hopping from cellar to cellar on your wine tasting trip, there is a lot to see in this specific peninsula. 

You can even spend a whole day in the hot springs, plus a couple of days can be set aside to visit the Enchanted Adventure Garden, the Ashcombe Maze, the National Park, the Bushrangers Bay and the Arthurs Seat-Eagle base station.

 

Margaret River 

For crisp white Chardonnays and full bodied Merlot head for Margaret River. Those visiting Perth will find it worth their time to take the three hour drive to the riverside wine country. It is another great place to showcase wine production in Australia.

Aside from wines, there is plenty more to do on the river. This small town offers quite a lot: Beaches, surf breaks, lighthouses, limestone caves, sea cliffs, trekking and whale watching between June and November.

 

Tasmania 

The best way to go to Tasmania is by ferry from Melbourne or by flight. The ferry takes around 15 hours, and the flight time is just over an hour. The state comprises several islands, and the main island being Tasmania. 

Although underrated, Tasmania produces excellent Riesling, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Gris. A vacation week will fly by in this part of the world. You can even take a scenic flight to see the state, go trekking, visit the parks and gardens, experience nature and wildlife, and taste the local cuisine.

Picture: Shutterstock / David Trindade


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