Unusual Profession: Join World Of Flavours

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A flavorist is a chemist responsible for discovering just the right combinations of certain substances, such as chemicals, botanical extracts and essential oils, to create and re-create natural and artificial flavors for use in food and beverage products, oral hygiene products, lip cosmetics, vitamins, and medicines

Course to study: This career requires seven years of hands-on study – five years of intensive study and two years apprenticing as a junior flavorist – before professional certification as a senior or master of the craft. Common traits that flavorists share are strong  creativity, mathematics, organic chemistry, communication, and recordkeeping skills.

What can you do as a qualified flavorist:  a  flavorist can succeed in any food and beverage industry, and also in the beauty or pharmaceutical  industries  everywhere there is  need  for a good scent. There are, for instance, flavour companies that  specialise  in preparing and selling extracts to  use in  wide variety of  industries.

Salary: The median salary of chemists, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, is $69,790. The range is $39,000 – $116,000.

“Flavorist is a very creative  profession where there is not just one answer  as to how a particular product should taste or smell. The profession obviously requires a good palate. Flavorists mimic natural flavours to recreate them with the use of chemicals. The  development process, of course,  has its pros and cons. While on the one hand sometimes using too much of  a  flavour can  eliminate the  memory of the original natural taste, on the other hand it allows creating flavours similar to the natural ones while avoiding  side effects such as allergy reactions. At the end we all use  flavours in all kind of products on a daily basis, whether it is a lemonade, marzipan or even lips balm, all  emitting pleasant fragrances, just  as people like it.”

Photo: Shutterstock

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