While other kids could not wait to escape from chemistry or biology classes, Dr. Stephanie Fanucchi, was more than eager to experiment and learn something new. Her fascination with science began at an early age and continued growing as her interest and knowledge grew as well. This year, Dr. Fanucchi became one of 15 young women scientists recognised for her innovative research in cancer and auto-immune diseases – winning a prestigious award from the L’Oréal UNESCO for Women in Science programme. And while she speaks about DNA modification, genes, cells kissing and incredible cutting-edge discoveries in the world of biochemistry and cell biology, she dreams big, yet simple dreams – to work in a biotech startup company one day and to be remembered as a relentlessly curious human being.

How does success differ from fame? What does the work day of a musician who inspires crowds of fans all over the world look like? What is the role of luck in the life of a musician? Answers to these and other questions were given us by Ben Gold, the British trance music DJ.

It is hard to believe there are still many fatal, not sufficiently explored diseases in the 21st century. One of them, Ebola, took more than 11.000 lives during a three-year-long outbreak in West Africa. In order to increase the public’s awareness of this issue and help students to understand more about how Ebola is diagnosed and treated, Sadhana Anantha, only 19, has designed a simulation of the diagnostic test for this illness. The way she did it and the feedback afterwards brought her the title of 2016 National Young Woman of Distinction by the Girl Scouts of the USA. This is her story.

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