9/11/2018 - 9:58 am

Women in Africa are Using Smartphones to Get Into Universities

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We’ve highlighted below some of the most recent reports in youth-related news and events. In this week's Friday news summary, we speak about Indian university that was left with only 15 professors, women in Africa that are using smartphones to get into universities and three English universities that are on the verge of bancruptcy. 

Indian university left with only 15 professors

The admission of PhD students at Rajasthan University is directly affected by the fact that university has only 15 professors, report Times of India. The students now have no other option but to turn to private universities in order to pursue their PhD studies. In total, 160 associate professors are waiting for the promotion, with some of them being at the university since 2012, but the institution has not taken any steps towards promoting them. Assistant professors are eligible to take four, associate professors six and professors eight PhD students. Even though university administration declated that all newly recruited assistant professors are eligible to take PhD students, only 320 students will benefit from it.

Women in Africa are using smartphones to get into universities

Forbes reports that development of smart technologies helps thousands of young women in underdeveloped countries to attend universities. Companies such as Vodafone have decided to help make the UN Sustainable Development Goal Four – receiving a quality education – a reality. Their Instant Schools program provides a free-access online platform for young women in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Ghana, Lesotho, Tanzania, Mozambique and South Africa. In this way, children struggling to attend schools can access quality education.

Three English universities on the verge of bankruptcy

Yahoo reports that three English universities are on the verge of bankruptcy. Additionally, other educational institutions are also struggling while relying on short-term loans. Nick Hillman, director of the Higher Education Policy Institute think tank stated: ''What is of concern is those universities that are resorting to taking bridging loans to tide them over until their student fees come in. They are borrowing just to survive.'' It is believed that two universities are located on the south coast, whille the third one is located in the North West. The main reasons for financial disaster can be found in the drop in international student numbers and failling numbers of 18-year-olds applying for universities.

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Read 62 times Last modified on 9/11/2018 - 10:31 am
Muamer Hirkic

Muamer is a Bachelor of English Language and Literature, currently pursuing MA degree in International Relations and Diplomacy.

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